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Components of a Waiter or Waitress Resume
By Sayaka Seino
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A resume is a very important part of applying for a job as a waiter or waitress. Plan to submit a resume along with your application. Be aware of the different jobs out there. You will want the highest position you are qualified for. The better the restaurant the larger your tips will be. An important part of a restaurant resume is work history. Some restaurants prefer that you have two to three years of experience. Others may not care and would be willing to train you. If you have worked at many different restaurants in a short amount of time, be prepared to explain why you no longer work for them. Showing your average tips will reflect the quality of your work. Let your references know ahead of time that they may be contacted.

Components of a Waiter or Waitress Resume
Some restaurants prefer that you have two to three years of experience.
More and more companies are expecting those that apply with them to have resumes. Restaurants and other food service locations are among a newer group of establishments that are requiring their employees– waiters, waitresses, and hostesses– to have resumes. If you plan on applying to work at a restaurant in the near future, chances are you will be asked to submit a resume along with your application.

When applying for a job as a waiter or waitress, it isn't always a good idea to take any job that will hire you. There is a vast range of server jobs out there and if you're not concerned with getting the best job, you'll find yourself working a position lower than your qualifications. Often the best pay includes getting the best tips, and the higher class the restaurant you work at, the better your tips will be. Having a well-written resume will give you a better chance of working at the highest class restaurant you're qualified for.

Your work history will be one of the main sections that a restaurant manager will look at. This is because the more you already know about food service and restaurant procedures, the less training you will require, and the more likely it is that you will get hired. Restaurants tend to work on a stepladder basis. There are some restaurants that will take and train inexperienced staff, and others that will only take a seasoned professional. Most of the higher quality restaurants require that you have at least 2 or 3 years of experience in the industry before they hire you. If you are new to the industry, don't be afraid to take a lesser-quality job at first. Serving can be extremely high stress and you will be grateful for the experience. After a couple years of experience, you will be rewarded by being more qualified to work for finer dining. Your resume will let the employer know at a glance what kind of experience you have to offer.

Be careful though– if they see you've worked at a lot of different restaurants in a short amount of time, they might think you are inconsistent, unreliable, or come up with other reasons that lead them to believe you might have gotten fired. It's fine to have an extensive work history as long as you're prepared to explain why you moved on to bigger and better things.

Components of a Waiter or Waitress Resume
If you plan on applying to work at a restaurant in the near future, chances are you will be asked to submit a resume along with your application.
You may also choose to include an estimate of the average amount of tips you earned at the previous food service venues you worked at. Averaging high tips usually denotes that you were a good waiter or waitress. Remember, anything you can do to show your strengths is going to help solidify you as a good candidate for the job.

Although an extensive education is usually not required, you will want to include what education you have. An education or a degree will show the employer that you are goal-oriented, motivated, and possess good work ethic; all things that will leave a good impression.

A waiter or waitress resume is one in which you will need to include references. However, it is sufficient just to indicate that you have them and to provide them at the request of the person who is interviewing you. Just remember when it comes time for your interview to bring your reference information with you. Be sure to talk to your references ahead of time and let them know you will be using their names.

You will be well-prepared to apply for any restaurant you'd like if your resume is carefully organized in this way. Show them you know what they are looking for and that you possess the skills and experience they need. Having a well-written resume on hand will show that you are confident in your abilities to serve.


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