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Networking — People Power
Job search myth number 1: Networking is asking people for a job. Wrong. Networking is asking others for advice. Asking for a job makes people feel uncomfortable. Asking for help makes people feel valued.

  1. Most of the available jobs are in the hidden job market. They aren't listed in the classifieds or placed with a headhunter. Find them through your network of contacts.
  2. Everyone you know is a contact. The average person knows dozen of people you don't know. Build your network of contacts.
  3. An easy way to develop a list of contacts: Get a piece of paper and pen. Time yourself 10 minutes. Then write down the first names of every adult you know, working or not. You'll be surprised how many people you really know. This is your network.
  4. Your network leads to other networks. People you know are primary contacts. People you're referred to by people you know are secondary contacts. Both are helpful sources of information.
  5. People to network with: friends, relatives, neighbors, colleagues, former co-workers, club members, and members of religious affiliations.
  6. Don't assume the little old lady who lives next door who hasn't worked for 30 years can't help you. How do you know whom she knows? Ask.
  7. It's not who you know but who you are willing to know. Become active in professional, social, civic organizations. Meet as many people as you can and get the word out.
  8. Looking for a job is a numbers game. The more contacts you make, the more interviews you'll get. The more interviews you have, the more offers you'll get.
  9. Don't mistake networking for singing the blues about your last employer. This is not the time to rail against your misfortune. Networking is about the future, not the past.
  10. Get your story straight. People can't help you if you don't give them the proper information. Know what you want in your next job before you start networking.
  11. Prepare a 60-second networking pitch. Explain why you left your last job, what kind of job you're looking for, in what kinds of industries. Then clarify with examples by listing five companies you'd like to work for.
  12. Try to network face to face, not over the phone. You'll get more buy-in with the personal touch. Ask for just 10 minutes of your contact's time, then stick to it.
  13. Pick their brain. Whom do they know who might be able to help you? Where could you go for more information? Do they have any ideas?
  14. Live on the phone during your job search. Call everyone you know. Telemarket.
  15. Telephone tag doesn't fly in job search. People won't try too hard to call you back. Don't leave a message. Keep calling until you reach the person directly.
  16. Work that room. Network at professional gettogethers: lunches, breakfast meetings, dinners, after-hours mixers, seminars, trade shows.
  17. Hand out a business card with your name, phone number, and field or area of specialization on it. It works.
  18. Turned down for a job? Use the interviewer as a networking contact. Interviewers may know of similar openings at other companies.
  19. Keep track of your network. Note the name of each contact, phone numbers, title, company, date, and disposition. Were there referrals? Suggestions? When should you check back with them?
  20. 235. Nurture your network. Send birthday, anniversary, get well, holiday cards. Keep in touch, especially when you don't need them. People like to feel needed, not used.
  21. The higher you are on the corporate ladder, the more you need to network. The old boy/girl network is alive and well. Use it.
  22. Don't forget to network with other job seekers. They're a tremendous source of information about specific industries and companies. They're out there making efforts to find jobs, just like you.


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Article ID: 900041354 www.preferredresumes.com

Article Title : Networking — People Power

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